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Noticeboard

Wednesday 17th July 2019

The telephone lines will be closed today from 12.30 until 8.00am Thursday 18th July 2019

Click Opening Hours then the Closed tab to find out who to ring if you need medical assistance

Text message service

We have started to use text messages to contact you about making appointments, if you wish to "opt out" of this service, please let us know.

New website coming soon!

DVLA Guidelines for Diabetic Patients

You can be fined up to £1,000 if you don’t tell DVLA about a medical condition that affects your driving. You may be prosecuted if you’re involved in an accident as a result.

Check with your nurse or doctor if you don’t know what type of medication you’re on.

 

Diabetes treated by insulin

Car or motorbike licence

You need to tell DVLA if:

Your insulin treatment lasts (or will last) over 3 months

You had gestational diabetes (diabetes associated with pregnancy) and your insulin treatment lasts over 3 months after the birth

You get disabling hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) - or a medical professional has told you that you’re at risk of developing it

  

To report your condition online, follow this link

https://www.gov.uk/diabetes-driving

 

You can also fill in form DIAB1(following the above link) and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form.

Read leaflet INF294 for more information about driving a car or motorbike with diabetes that’s treated with insulin.

 

Bus, coach or lorry licence

You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin.

Fill in form VDIAB1I and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form.

Read leaflet INS186 if you want to apply for vocational entitlement to drive larger vehicles (C1, C1E, D1, DIE, C, CE, D or DE).

Diabetes treated by tablets or non-insulin injections

Car or motorbike licence

Check with your doctor or nurse to find out if your treatment means you need to tell DVLA.

If you do need to tell DVLA, fill in form DIAB1and send it to the address on the form.

Read leaflet INF188/2 for more information about driving with diabetes that’s treated with non-insulin medication, diet or both.

Bus, coach or lorry licence

You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated by tablets or non-insulin injections. You must fill in:

form VDIAB1SG if your diabetes is treated by sulphonylurea or glinide tablets

form VDIAB1GEN if your diabetes is treated by any other tablets or non-insulin injections

Send the form to DVLA. The address is on the form.

 

Diabetes treated by diet

Car or motorbike licence

You don’t need to tell DVLA.

Read leaflet INF188/2 for more information about driving with diabetes that’s treated by changes in diet.

Bus, coach or lorry licence

You don’t need to tell DVLA.

 



 
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